EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH

The past 25 years of research on Emotional Intelligence has shown it as the most significant contributer to personal success and happiness. Here are just some of the specific outcomes that research found:

PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH:

Studies done with Hallmark Communities showed sales staff that developed EQ were 25% more productive, whilst developing the individual and team EQ at Talentsmart improved group cohesion and job performance (Bradberry, 2002).

MORE PRODUCTIVE LEADERSHIP:

85% of the competencies attributed to successful leaders lie in the emotional intelligence domain (Goleman, 1998).

PROFIT GAINS:

Research at a Multinational Consulting Firm showed that partners high in EQ were responsible for $1.2 million more profit each in their clients than low EQ partners. High EQ partners also showed a 139% gain in profit (Boyatzis, 1999).

SUCCESS IN LEADERSHIP:

AT&T participated in a large, cross-industry study that found in all levels of management (from line supervisors to senior executives) increased emotional intelligence accounted for 20% more productivity than low EQ leaders (Bradberry, 2002).

PERFORMANCE INCREASE OF LEADERS:

An International Soft Drink Corporation saw division leaders who developed EQ competencies outperform their targets by more than 15%. Division leaders who didn’t develop their EQ missed targets by the same margin (McClelland, 1999).

TOP PERFORMERS:

Across cultures executives selected for emotional intelligence are more likely to succeed than those chosen for IQ or job experience. In Latin America, Germany and Japan, 74% of top performers were high in EQ while only 24% of low performers were high in EQ (Cherniss, 2003).

STAFF TURNOVER:

A study conducted with more than 2 million employees throughout seven hundred companies proved that the length of time an employee stays at a company is determined by his relationship with his immediate superior (Zipkin, 2000). 43% of employees who leave companies do so because of bad managers (Goleman, 1998).

TOP LEVELS EXECUTIVE:

An analysis of top-level executives from 15 global companies showed that 6 emotional intelligence competencies distinguished the stars from the average employees: Development of people; Influence; Adaptability; Self-confidence; Achievement drive; and Leadership ability. Only one cognitive competency that was as strong in distinguishing the stars from the average employees was Analytical Thinking (Spencer, 1997).

REDUCTION IN LOST-TIME ACCIDENTS:

When supervisors in a manufacturing plant were empowered with EQ competencies, it was found that lost-time accidents were reduced by 50%, formal grievances were reduced, and the plant exceeded productivity goals by $250 000 (Pesaric & Byham, 1996).